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Xbox Encourages Everyone to Get COVID-19 Vaccine, Reject “Common Myths”

Xbox COVID-19 Vaccine

Editor’s Note: The links in this article citing the allegations against the various COVID-19 vaccines are not an endorsement of those allegations. 

Microsoft’s Xbox brand has encouraged fans and gamers to get the COVID-19 vaccine, and rejecting allegations against its safety.

Along with a Q&A with CDC representatives on Twitch, the official Xbox twitter account tweeted messages encouraging others to get the vaccine.

The account then tweeted what had been stated in the Q&A, including dispelling “some common COVID-19 myths” [1, 2]. The posts denounce that the vaccine contains microchips, magnets, can alter DNA, cause someone to catch COVID-19, have an impact on fertility or pregnancy, and showed no signs of long-term health problems in those who had already been vaccinated.

Microsoft also highlighted how users could donate their Microsoft Rewards Points to the CDC Foundation to help fund research. Nonetheless, some have been concerned about the vaccines, along with calls by some governments for mandatory vaccines or business to only employ those who are vaccinated; leaning to protests and marches worldwide.

 

Concerns have included allegations of complications from the vaccine having a higher mortality rate than the virus in a healthy person [1, 2, 3, 4], including developing cardiological and neurological issues.

Conflicting reports of whether booster shots were needed (along with fluctuating demands for lockdown and when lockdown would end) and reports of the fully vaccinated still dying of COVID-19 [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7] also gave rise to doubt.

Recent reports of the Moderna vaccine being contaminated with metal flakes in Japan (leading to two deaths) are sure to have done little to dissuade these fears, along with allegations that those who are vaccinated can become “super spreaders” [1, 2]. Fact checkers have also denied [1, 2] that testing on animals had to be halted because of wide spread deaths.

Other concerns allegations of nepotism in regards to the vaccine’s approval. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses the National Institutes of Health’s testing and approval for medicine and vaccines (NIH).

 

The head of the NIH is Christine Grady; married to the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and 2nd Chief Medical Advisor to the President Dr. Anthony Fauci. In addition, former FDA Deputy Commissioner for Medical and Scientific Affairs and Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb is now a Pfizer board member.

While Bloomberg reported “the largest real-world analysis” showing immunity developed from previously catching the virus as better than the vaccine; others had the aforementioned doubts and  allegations of sabotage of alternative treatment and preventative measures [1, 2, 3].

Amid Dr. Fauci’s leaked emails in June of this year, there were allegations of emails showing that those who were asymptomatic could not spread the disease, and allegedly stating in 2020 “the epidemic will gradually decline and stop on its own without a vaccine.”

 

There are also concerns over the lockdown measures becoming permanent, and a method to enforce totalitarianism. The vaccine passports being proposed in various nations have led to concerns of their powers being expanded to beyond leisure, shopping, and leisure; such as banking or leading to a social credit system akin to China [1, 2].

A patent for COVID-19 testing beginning in 2015 (but filed in 2020), and allegations of the PCR tests not being able to detect COVID-19 have also added to the concerns lockdown measures will be used as an excuse. This is further maximized by increasingly brutal enforcement of lockdown measures in Australia [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8] and Ireland [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7].

Image: Pixabay, Twitter

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Ryan Pearson

About

Taking his first steps onto Route 1 and never stopping, Ryan has had a love of RPGs since a young age. Now he's learning to appreciate a wider pallet of genres and challenges.




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