Nintendo Put NES Golf in Every Switch Console as Tribute to Satoru Iwata

As you might have heard already, dataminers working on the Nintendo Switch found a fully functioning NES emulator in the system known as “Flog.”

Flog, or Golf backwards, only plays the classic NES game Golf, while adding in motion control support via the Joy-Con. This is a tribute to the late Nintendo president Satoru Iwata, who passed away over two years ago.

While the way to play Golf on the Switch has been found, accessing the easter egg is easier said than done. If you want to play it yourself, you’ll probably have to wait a bit.

The method of unlocking the game requires that the system’s date is set to July 11th. As soon as you connect the console to the internet, however, the system also checks the date via network time sync, even if the user turned off time sync in the settings. This does mean, however, that consoles that never connected to the internet can simply change the time in settings and perform this.

When July 11th, 2018 rolls around, you can access Golf by doing the following:

  1. Going to the home screen with your Joy-Con detached from the system
  2. Pointing both Joy-Con downwards
  3. Quickly moving both Joy-Con to a vertical position and holding them still until Golf loads

Why this specific date and motion? As previously mentioned, it’s all a tribute to the late Satoru Iwata. Golf was one of the first games he programmed for Nintendo, the motion you perform is based on the hand motion Iwata commonly used during Nintendo Directs, and Iwata died on July 11th, 2015.

While Nintendo hasn’t said anything publicly about this, Nintendo has announced that updated NES and SNES games are coming to the console when their paid online service launches in 2018. Alongside this, Nintendo and Hamster are also releasing Nintendo Arcade Classics for the Switch starting this month.

Matthew Sigler

About

Currently interning at Niche Gamer. I've been playing video games since I was three years old.

  • Steve Brandon

    Shouldn’t it be July 11th, not June 11th?

    Satoru Iwata died July 11th, 2015.

  • OldPalpy

    I’m sure Iwata would have appreciated more if they got their head out of their ass over VC instead of doing well whatever vague plans they have with NES/SNES on Switch right now but then again it’s not like VC wasn’t a depressing mess under him as well.

  • Yeah this was something I missed, fixed! Sorry about that

  • Travis Touchdown
  • Dewey Defeats Truman

    Nintendo hasn’t been the same since Iwata passed.

  • InfectedAI

    I avoid VC like the plague unless the games are on sale. Expecting you to rebuy old roms over and over on every system is bullshit. I have PS1 classics I bought ages ago that I played on the PSP, PS3, and then Vita. I’m still playing the original DOOM after who knows how many hardware generations. Apps I bought on my phone when Android was a fledgling experiment work on my current phone. I’m NOT purchasing them again.

  • InfectedAI

    Interesting that they did it on the day of his death instead of his birthday or some other significant day.

  • Jettythesunfish

    I still miss him…

  • Sean Sharpe

    They come off as a lot more cold and corporate now. Iwata seemed to genuinely enjoy video games, as opposed to pretty much every other executive in the industry.

  • Mechonis

    This is actually a really cool. The game sucks still, but it is neat

  • DrearierSpider

    Oh please, they were still milking children and retards for overpriced happy meal toy DLC for years before Iwata died, among other things. Nintendo has long been a scummy company.

  • TheOnceAndFutureKing

    Years before he died? Isn’t the Amiibo shit fairly recent?

  • TheOnceAndFutureKing

    well…people don’t remember 9/11 on the day the WTC was built

  • Fandangle

    “To pay tribute to iwata they port an old game to to the console”

    good job nintendo.

  • Sean Sharpe

    Right. But you’re missing the point. It’s not whether or not Nintendo was actually any different, since they are still a massive corporation that wants your cash, but the illusion that they weren’t. (Also, amiibo? I don’t know why people bitch about them because there’s only one game where Amiibo do anything worthwhile; everything else extra crap.)

  • InfectedAI

    That’s a big historic event. People are usually remembered by something positive. For example Marin Luther King Jr Day was based on his birthday not his death.

  • Squirrel on crack cocaine.

    Wow, two years already! Time flies.

  • Zombie_Barioth

    True, but then some people prefer making the day somebody passed a day to remember.

    Some people mourn, others celebrate life.

    And Iwata’s passing is a pretty big deal, he was much more than just some CEO. He was one of the most influential guys at Nintendo’s history.

  • David Curry

    Reggie is the last of the old guard (since Miyamoto barely makes appearances anymore). The Switch pre-launch presentation looked like Toyota or Softbank or any random Japanese company, instead of a Nintendo presentation.

  • DrearierSpider

    With Twilight Princess HD’s locked dungeon and Return of Samus’s locked hard difficulty, I’d put the scummy Amiibos to at least 2 games that I can think of the top of my head. And you’re now the one missing the point: it’s 2 games with substantial content restricted via Amiibos so far. They’ve been getting progressively worse, and it doesn’t take a genius to tell that this is only the beginning.

  • InfectedAI

    Definitely, I admire the guy. I’m not downplaying his importance. Just noting they chose they day of his death rather than his birthday, or the release of his first game or something.

  • Zombie_Barioth

    Oh I know, just saying that some people do things a bit differently is all.

    I suppose that makes it all the more fitting for Nintendo.

  • Sean Sharpe

    Twilight Princess HD came with the Amiibo in question, if you bought it physically and since it only had one printing its mostly a non-issue unless you bought it used or were dumb enough to buy a Wii U game digitally.