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Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment has Shipped Over 400K Units Worldwide

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Nlf4WUsMUs

Bandai Namco has announced that Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment has shipped over 400,000 units worldwide.

The Playstation Vita adaptation is mostly based off the anime interpretation of the light novel original, while also throwing various characters from different story arcs together.

It debuted on April 24th in Japan, while the game arrived in North America on August 19th and on August 20th in Europe, as a Playstation Network exclusive. Coming from this, it’s worth noting that Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment is only available at retail in Japan or Asia, as the game is also available in Chinese.

You can read our review for Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment here.

Another game in the series, Sword Art Online: Lost Song, was recently confirmed for both Playstation Vita and Playstation 3.

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8 comments
  1. TheExile285
    TheExile285
    October 14, 2014 at 11:07 am

    Excellent

  2. Phelan
    Phelan
    October 14, 2014 at 11:56 am

    “shipped”?
    “worldwide”?

    That rather means only JP and HK, as those were the only places where they could shipped their game.

  3. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    October 14, 2014 at 12:10 pm

    So the Famitsu article cites the 400K number:

    http://www.famitsu.com/news/201410/14063474.html

    And mentions that those numbers are worldwide numbers, while if you look at other numbers from back in September:

    http://dengekionline.com/elem/000/000/929/929057/

    They said then it sold over 350K units worldwide. I’m not sure if these include digital copies or not as that would be silly to use that phrasing, but I’ll update the OP with that clarification.

  4. Phelan
    Phelan
    October 14, 2014 at 12:18 pm

    Nah those are only physical copies. They always say clearly when they are adding digital copies to number, like in case of… hmmm….. Freedom Wars.

    Damn shame that we didn’t get SAO in EU or NA :/ That game deserved to be released properly. But Bandai Namco was thinking that it won’t sell… well… they made mistake, not the first one.. and not the last one.

    But probably it would have safe number of sold copies, very similar to Tales of Hearts R probably.

  5. nonscpo
    nonscpo
    October 14, 2014 at 3:43 pm

    Thats fantastic! not that it matters as Im sure BandaiNamco will just state insufficient sales as a reason to deny us a retail release of the next game.

  6. bf313
    bf313
    October 15, 2014 at 12:50 pm

    Really wish we could get some concrete numbers on how well it sold in the West. Top of the Vita sales charts two months in a row should mean strong sales, but hopefully it continues to have legs.

  7. A history of Vita games: The birth and rise of the Asian-English market – kresnik258gaming
    February 7, 2018 at 3:13 am

    […] This was just the first insight into the market though as Bandai-Namco would soon go one better in May with Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment. The popular anime title was released in English a full three months before a western version was available, suggesting that the localization had been greenlit on the basis of prospective Asian sales alone. It was hugely popular among importers (despite the fact it was hampered by an awful localization) but would be the first game to truly usher in the new era of games being translated for the Asian-English market thanks to its success (shifting 400k copies worldwide). […]

  8. A Look Back at the Birth & Rise of the Asian-English Market on Vita - Zero Sleep
    February 18, 2018 at 12:42 am

    […] This was just the first insight into the market, though, as Bandai-Namco would soon go one better in May with Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment. The popular anime title was released in English a full three months before a western version was available, suggesting that the localization had been greenlit on the basis of prospective Asian sales alone. It was hugely popular among importers (despite the fact that it was hampered by an awful localization) and would be the first title to truly usher in the new era of games being translated for the Asian-English market thanks to its success (it shifted 400k copies worldwide). […]