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Twitch Updates Policies on Nudity and Attire, and Sexually Suggestive Content

Twitch VR Chat Simp

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Twitch have announced an update to their policies, specifically those related to “Nudity and Attire” and “Sexually Suggestive Content” policies.

For those unfamiliar, Twitch has been criticized in recent years for not enforcing their rules against female streamers who dress or act provocatively, and make the main focus of their streams that content instead of video games.

These “Twitch Thots” are also accused of taking advantage of desperate and isolated single men, by allowing them to keep a delusion that donating money to them will eventually lead to a real life relationship with them (a man such as this is also called a “Simp”).

Now, Twitch has stated they have updated their policies on nudity and attire. Their blog post explained these changes came from feedback about the terms not being clear.

“Historically, to address the variety of situations and content on Twitch, our policy on Nudity and Attire focused on context. We’ve heard from our community, however, that our policy isn’t clear enough about what is and is not allowed on stream, and in particular that more detail is needed for streams like body art or outdoor streams. We want to be more transparent and consistent about our expectations, so today we’re rolling out an update to our Nudity and Attire policy that outlines detailed examples of what is and is not permitted.”

In summation, the following policies are in effect.

  • Rather than based on the type of clothing, what is shown and a “standard level of coverage” policy is being used. This is later refereed to as “minimum levels of coverage” in the blog however.
  • “We don’t permit streamers to be fully or partially nude, including exposing genitals or buttocks. We do not permit the visible outline of genitals, even when covered. Broadcasting nude or partially nude minors is always prohibited, regardless of context.”
  • “For those who present as women, we ask that you cover your nipples. We do not permit exposed underbust. Cleavage is unrestricted as long as these coverage requirements are met.”
  • “For all streamers, you must cover the area extending from your hips to the bottom of your pelvis and buttocks. “
  • “For those areas of the body where coverage is required, the coverage must be fully opaque – sheer or partially see-through clothing does not constitute coverage”
  • “Augmented reality avatars that translate real-life movement into digital characters are subject to this standard, as is cosplay and other costumes.” […] “VRChat is categorized as a game on Twitch, and in-game virtual reality models are not subject to our policy on Nudity and Attire. This content must still comply with our policy on Nudity and Sexual Content in Embedded Media and Games however, so you may not modify your game to include nudity, or make sexual elements a primary focus of your broadcast.”

Within the community guidelines on Nudity and Attire itself, the following is also stated:

  • Games featuring nudity, pornography, sex, or sexual violence as a core focus or feature, and gameplay modified to feature these elements are entirely prohibited. Occurrences of in-game nudity are permitted, so long as you do not make them a primary focus of your content and only spend as much time as needed in the area to make progress. Games rated Adults Only (AO) by the ESRB are not permitted in gameplay-oriented broadcasts or complete or unedited format on Twitch.”
  • “Conversations about sex, nudity, and other mature topics that are intended to be educational and otherwise comply with our policies should be marked as Mature Content via the respective channel’s settings.”
  • As we do not yet provide sufficient tools for viewers to limit their exposure to nudity and mature content, artistic and educational nudity are not allowed. We are working on ways to make this possible in the future.”

Twitch’s blog post also notes their previous policies “relied on an assumed shared understanding of what is appropriate in specific contexts.” As such, these new standards are designed for nearly any “context.”

However, there are exceptions. These include IRL streaming, swimming, at the beach, concerts and festivals, body art, context transitions, “embedded media, studio and other Twitch-endorsed content,” and breastfeeding.

More “clarification” has also been added to the Sexually Suggestive Content policy. “To further clarify our stance, we’ve added concrete examples of content considered sexually suggestive.” According to the community guidelines on that segment, this forbids:

  • “Content or camera focus on breasts, buttocks, or pelvic region, including poses that deliberately highlight these elements”
  • “Groping or explicit gestures directed towards breasts, buttocks, or genitals”
  • “Fetishizing behavior or activity, such as focusing on body parts for sexual gratification or erotic role play”
  • “Simulated sex acts or sexual stimulation”
  • “Using or featuring sex toys in contexts unrelated to sexual education”
  • “Erotic dances, such as those involving stripping or flashing”
  • “Pole dances or acrobatics with sexually suggestive framing
  • “Posting, displaying, or sharing erotica, including detailed descriptions of sex acts or pornography”

While these rules are now in effect, Twitch states they are asking users to remove any of their older content that violates any new terms by May 1st. “After that time, if reported, we will remove the content, but no other enforcement actions will be taken against the channel.”

Image: Twitch, YouTube


Ryan Pearson

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Taking his first steps onto Route 1 and never stopping, Ryan has had a love of RPGs since a young age. Now he's learning to appreciate a wider pallet of genres and challenges.