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Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Victory Screen Updated to Remove Minecraft Steve’s Meat

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Steve Victory Meat

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate has quietly updated the victory screen for Minecraft‘s Steve, due to the unfortunate placement of some meat.

The game is available now for Nintendo Switch. In case you missed it, you can find our thorough review for the game here (we highly recommend it!) After Steve was added to the game as DLC [1, 2], some fans found something humorous about a victory screen for the character.

As seen in the video below (specifically at 0:05 or the thumbnail), after Steve has finished eating his cooked meat, he lowers his hand. Due to the limited articulation, this gives the illusion Steve is holding his meat in front of his crotch. Combined with the grill-marks on the cooked meat and other factors, some may consider it looks like a penis.

Fans noticed that after a recent patch- 9.0.1– the victory screen had changed. While no mention was made of it in the patch notes, Steve will now fully consume the cooked meat, and leave his arm by his side. You can find that in the video below (at 0:26).

This is not the first time Super Smash Bros. Ultimate has removed images deemed inappropriate. While the custom stage builder saw some fans making lewd or otherwise inappropriate stages (later removed), the developers themselves altered Mr. Game and Watch’s model before the game’s launch.

While the character’s attacks had references to Game & Watch games, his attacks now resemble the sprites used in those games. One of those attacks has him strike foes with a burning stick. This is in reference to Fire Attack, in which a cowboy defends a wooden fort from being burned down by native Americans. The feathered headband was removed from the character.

Did Nintendo overreact in this situation? Could Microsoft have been upset? Sound off in the comments below!

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Ryan Pearson

About

Taking his first steps onto Route 1 and never stopping, Ryan has had a love of RPGs since a young age. Now he's learning to appreciate a wider pallet of genres and challenges.