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Criminal Girls: Invite Only was “Guaranteed an AO Rating,” it was Censored “So That We Could Bring the Game Over”

The censorship saga continues. Previously, we had reported on how NIS America was localizing the extremely risque Vita game, Criminal Girls: Invite Only. The game is mostly known for its punishment mini-game, in which you can spank, grope, and electrocute, etc. the condemned girls.

We followed up with that report both in a statement from NIS America that Criminal Girls would be slightly censored, and discussed this on one of our weekly podcasts that highlighted the controversy. We’re obviously on the anti-censorship side of the fence, in any sense of the matter.

We and many of our fans were skeptical of the game being too risque for the ESRB (and various EU equivalents), but apparently this is the case, as we’ve learned that Criminal Girls: Invite Only in its original form would have gotten the dreaded AO rating.

When asked about just how sure they were of Criminal Girls receiving an AO rating, a NIS America representative gave us this response:

“Criminal Girls was guaranteed an AO rating in its original form and the modifications made in the game were done so that we could bring the game over. The modifications were not done as an attempt to isolate our current fans or appeal to a wider audience.”

Also, because you guys were kind enough to ask me, I also prompted our NIS America rep to see how Akiba’s Trip: Undead & Undressed would be coming to EU territories (NIS America is localizing it there for XSEED) because the fear was that it too would be censored.

His response will hopefully ease your concerns:

“As far as I know, Akiba’s Trip will be able to pass ratings boards in both the NA and EU regions as is.”

So, to be clear, Criminal Girls will simply have more fog added and see the Japanese voices of the girls during the mini-games removed as well. This is a better scenario over having the mini-games removed entirely, like NIS America did with the bath mini-game in Mugen Souls Z.

It does bring up the question of where the line is drawn for the ESRB (and worldly equivalents) as far as content go, however the blame is with them and not NIS America.

For most countries, having gratuitous violence will generally give you an M (for mature) rating, but the moment you have excessive or uncensored sexuality and or nudity in the game, it generally equates to an AO (adults only) rating.

For those who are unaware, an AO rating essentially means your game is blacklisted, vendors won’t sell it and online distributors like Steam and the PlayStation Network won’t touch it either. An AO rating is usually associated with pornography games, where sex is generally the only goal.

This is similar with X rated movies or its new form, the NC-17 rating (no one under 17 years old admitted), which came after the porn industry widely used the X rating.

I’m very thankful for NIS America for being so good to us, and helping us shed some more light on this whole situation. So how do you guys feel about this? Do you think censorship laws and or cultural norms are completely backwards?

,
Brandon Orselli

About

Owner and Publisher at Niche Gamer and Nicchiban. Outlaw fighting for a better game industry. Pronouns: Patriarch, Guido, Olive.




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49 comments
  1. Captmotorcycle
    Captmotorcycle
    July 18, 2014 at 3:54 pm

    I say bring the game over untouched or don’t bring it over at all.

  2. Carl B.
    Carl B.
    July 18, 2014 at 4:01 pm

    ^This + 100

  3. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 18, 2014 at 4:17 pm

    While I agree with you, I think if they at least left in the audio I would have been ok with just adding in more fog.

    Still, I’m completely against censoring of any kind, but for some reason people revel in uncensored violence, and not sex.

    It’s just strange to me and I don’t why fetishizing murder in fiction is somehow more publicly acceptable, while fetishizing sex isn’t.

  4. Koroma
    Koroma
    July 18, 2014 at 4:23 pm

    Infuriating but i wonder if it’s the ESRB fault or the console makers? Not sure about my dvd player but my old VCR plays X rated movies just fine.

  5. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 18, 2014 at 4:26 pm

    He simply said that it would have gotten an AO as is : I’m assuming this means when they proposed it to the board, they simply told them it would have gotten that rating. This in turn would mean Sony wouldn’t approve it for the PSN, retailers wouldn’t carry it, etc.

    It’s a really shitty situation when you have games that glorify violence getting a pass, while games that fetishize sex get panned.

    The game doesn’t even have explicit sexual intercourse, it merely has those punishment mini-games, you know?

    I’m thankful again for NISA getting back to me, as I felt like the entire thing needed further clarification.

  6. Captmotorcycle
    Captmotorcycle
    July 18, 2014 at 4:44 pm

    Not trying be totally mean but, how many people are going to buy this game? It isn’t like some average kid will get this and their parents are going to have a stroke over it. Anime-esque games never hit wide appeal markets, so why not just keep the ‘core’ happy? Charge me $100 for an uncut game, hell I’ll pay it.

  7. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 18, 2014 at 4:55 pm

    That’s a great point, and one the main arguments we had in our podcast.

    It’s a very dumb situation in general, because the fans clearly want the game to be uncensored, and yet the ratings board just won’t let it pass, apparently.

    The only other route they could go would be to sell it strictly through their online store as an uncut version, but I digress.

  8. R353ARCH
    R353ARCH
    July 18, 2014 at 6:08 pm

    Yeah but “bring it untouched or not at all” isn’t good reasoning, as much as I’d like for that to be possible.

    This sort of art style and gameplay (distractions) isn’t typical in mainstream US culture. When this title breaks new ground and challenges new acceptabilities, sitting next to other games at game and/or toy stores where uninformed parents shop, I’d like to see acceptance become a gradual thing, and not shock the religious crusaders into bringing legislation into restrictions on video game media.

    Yes, there’s no guarantee that is true, but still, if you like these pervy games, and want access to more of them, you wouldn’t want to start now with the “my way or highway” mentality that other reporters have been displaying.

    It’d be great if everyone was open minded or at least minded their own, but as you all know that won’t be the case, but social acceptance can happen over time as long as nobody goes and tries publishing a full blown H-Game with, dare I say, special interest themes.

    Let’s just take it easy, voice what we want, complain when you want to, but certainly don’t hate NISA or other publishers for trying their hardest to put translated versions of Japanese games with interesting visuals into our hands.

    I’ve had a lot of fun with NISA and will continue to support the games they publish (even if I don’t always get around to actually opening all their games).

  9. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 18, 2014 at 6:21 pm

    Well said.

    I think despite my grumblings about the game being censored, it does take some balls for NIS America to localize this game. No matter which way they approach it, some people are going to get shocked, offended, and or repulsed by it.

    There will also be fans like us who just want the game uncensored, and all we know so far is that that just can’t happen, with the current standings in the ESRB, the game itself, and so on. I commend them for bringing the game over, and yet I wish it could be uncensored.

    I think one thing that we haven’t really talked about much on here is the very nature of those mini-games, the tone of them, you know? Compare them to say, the exploding clothes of Senran Kagura.

    In Criminal Girls it could easily be taken literally as a punishment/torturing/masochism type scenario to those ignorant passerbys. It’s not meant to be serious, but lots of people could perceive it as serious in nature, therefore making it quite offensive to them.

    IDK. I hope with every editorial I write, every fanservice-y game we cover and review, that we get a step closer to acceptance of these games.

  10. Carl B.
    Carl B.
    July 18, 2014 at 6:23 pm

    Here is where I think Capt makes the iron clad point that ends the discussion. Your average gamer isn’t buying these games. The only folks who buy this stuff are people like us. Adult, mature gamers who like Japanese games and culture. That’s it.

    I too would pay for an uncensored one, to be honest.

  11. nonscpo
    nonscpo
    July 18, 2014 at 8:21 pm

    Another excelent example of why the war against Adult video games needs to end with the average gamer now in their 30s the ban on AOrated games needs to end!

  12. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 18, 2014 at 8:38 pm

    I whole-heartedly agree. It just doesn’t make any sense, especially when the majority of the players who will buy this want to buy it purely for the fanservice. Anything else is extra, and of great value. But remove that fanservice? Ugh… I mean it’s boiling down to the rating system so :

  13. 32
    32
    July 18, 2014 at 9:04 pm

    “(because NIS America is localizing it there for XSEED)”
    And I’ll be importing the XSeed version. Even if the game isn’t getting touched in the NISA version, they’d overprice it and I don’t want them getting my money at all. Maybe that’s petty but I’m still upset about Rhapsody and having seen the attitude of some of the staff members of NISA, they don’t really care for my money anyway.

    I’m still in the “either bring it over uncensored or don’t bring it over at all” group. If the game is going to cause problems (e.g. them feeling the need to censor it) then pick something else.

    I can’t see what would give it such a rating (there’s no nudity, similarly sexy mini-games have gotten less), even if the characters look somewhat young, there’s no way to prove their ages and, if there was, you remove the ages or any other indication that they’re underage (plenty of games have done this when being localised).

    Heck, adding steam is going to end up giving the illusion that the games are sexier than they really are (adding steam to crotches when the girls are wearing shorts and it’ll look like they’re naked).

    It should also be added that they’re changing some dialogue as well. http://a.pomf.se/xfecwu.png

  14. TiamatNM
    TiamatNM
    July 19, 2014 at 1:01 am

    Why didn’t NISA just say this in the first place? I’m thinking about complaining to ESRB about their stupid standards.

  15. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 19, 2014 at 1:16 am

    IIRC there was that original post or comments via FB, or Twitter, someone somewhere said it would have gotten an AO rating, but there wasn’t a solid confirmation.

    That’s what I tried for with my recent talk with them, a bit more finality.

  16. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 19, 2014 at 1:20 am

    I mean to us it doesn’t make sense for it to get an AO rating, but for all we know each judge at the ESRB has their own judgement right? Presumably this would lead to similar games possibly getting different ratings, if not evaluations.

  17. TiamatNM
    TiamatNM
    July 19, 2014 at 1:29 am

    I only knew about the stuff Houk said on the NISA forum and from what I saw he never explicitly stated that it was guaranteed AO (which is pretty definitive to say ‘guaranteed’). If this was really the case and they weren’t prevented from saying so because of NDA or something I don’t get why they wouldn’t reveal this immediately to take the heat off. I mostly trust them but they could really handle this kind of thing better.

  18. kanade3
    kanade3
    July 19, 2014 at 12:20 pm

    I’ve asked Houk in the CG censorship thread to verify if the statement is true,and if it came from a actual rep with authority to discuss such things so now we just have to wait for a response.

  19. Alistair
    Alistair
    July 19, 2014 at 12:27 pm

    PEGI would rise a eye brow or two, but still give it a either 12 or worse come to the worse a PEGI-16 because it a different variation of mon-mon but the items to punish them as a sexual violence would tilt it to PEGI-16 if even worse a PEGI-18.

    But those images are still not enough to get a AO, they not completely naked in the mini-games when the lolis are naked it in a static cutscene.

    Thank god that we EU don’t have a AO like you lot have

  20. Alistair
    Alistair
    July 19, 2014 at 12:34 pm

    But then there is another question why would PEGI would pass mon-mon uncut why would Xseed release their games uncut & pass ESRB & rated M.

    I think the items is the only thing that push it another notch then mon-mon & that may ESRB uneasy about that.

    Still pretty tame though the SK series is basically a sexual violence of loli fighting game with the clothes ripped gimmick.

  21. Alistair
    Alistair
    July 19, 2014 at 3:24 pm

    I find this email from PEGI I’m afraid it to long to fit it all in, but I thought you may like what PEGI thoughts of boobs & buttocks.

    Take note of the PEGI-16 & PEGI-18 the boobs & buttocks are not on par with other parts of the body meaning boobs & arse are not treated as visible sex organs. & what does other games shows boobs & arse.

  22. bf313
    bf313
    July 19, 2014 at 3:43 pm

    In situations like this I always place the blame on the ESRB not the publisher. No company that localizes niche games wants to censor the games they release. There is a world of difference between this and a company like Nintendo censoring Bravely Default.

    I also think that the “bring it uncensored, or don’t bother” idea is short sighted. So many people try to say, “i’ll just import it instead” but to me that’s an absolute piss away of your money because you can’t even read or understand the story. People complain about cut content but yet can’t even read the import games that they’re playing. The only way that things will change is if boundaries are pushed, games might get censored in the process but it’s for the greater good of bringing games like this to Western markets. If you boycott it you aren’t pushing limits or looking at the bigger picture. Games with over the top violence weren’t deemed to be ok until the market became flooded with them, same thing needs to happen with games that have risque sexual content.

  23. grgspunk
    grgspunk
    July 19, 2014 at 7:13 pm

    Mr. Orselli, I understand the ESRB and its ratings system may have been a factor, but there’s one problem: When NISA censors their games under the argument that a game will get AO-rated, they do the censoring before they submit them for an official rating.

    http://nisamerica.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=92&t=13487&start=780#p772861

    It’s one thing if the game does get officially rated “AO” and we can look it up on the ESRB’s website, but it’s a completely different matter if they’re just having “unofficial conversations” with a few members at the organization.

    I’ve had some pretty heated arguments with them and some of their defenders when it comes to censorship-related matters on their forums, with the most recent being with regards to their censorship of Mugen Souls Z. My biggest gripe there was not just the censoring itself, but also the fact that they claimed that the game was gong to be AO without officially submitting it to the ESRB.

    According to their livestream, they explain that they made their
    decision to censor Mugen Souls Z based on some talks with members of
    various ratings boards (http://www.twitch.tv/nisamerica/b/522753121).

    Since NISA’s discussions with the ESRB members all took place backstage, it’s not like they provided us with transcripts/emails proving it. All we had was NISA’s word for it. Without anything offical from the ESRB itself, none of us know for sure if the content was enough for the game to be rated AO.

    None of us know who NISA talked with, what their position in ESRB was, how much influence they had in the ratings process, or if they were even part of the ESRB in the first place.

    If MSZ wasn’t officially rated by the ESRB and they’re just
    saying it’s gonna get rated AO, then there’s nothing to verify that it
    was going to get said rating. If there’s nothing to verify that, then it’s possible NISA may have censored it because they themselves just didn’t like the content they saw, and used the posssibility of an AO-rating as an excuse to deflect the blame.

    Now, I see them using the same argument for CG:IO, and guess what happens when I look up the game on http://www.ersb.org? Nothing. This tells me they’re censoring it before submitting it to the ESRB again.

    I don’t know if there were any backstage talks with ESRB members like they say they did with MSZ, but for whatever reason, they’re claiming they know for sure the game in its uncut form is going to be AO rated, so they’re censoring the game before they submit it for an official rating again.

    At this point, It’s far too easy for a company to censor out of sheer dislike for such content or a desire to “appeal to a wider audience” and then hide it by saying “This game was guaranteed to get rated AO” in an interview or a press release.

    I really wish the ESRB would submit C&Ds to developers/publishers who make statements about how a game would be rated when the organization itself hasn’t disclosed any official ratings or statements. It’s their reputation that’s getting damaged by having their brand being thrown around like this.

  24. bf313
    bf313
    July 19, 2014 at 7:58 pm

    You’re aware that it costs money to get a game rated by the ESRB right? It would be a stupid move for NISA to attempt to get a game like this rated as is only to be met with an AO when they’ve obviously been advised by the ESRB in advance that it would end up with that rating. Then they would have to make cuts and pay for the rating process all over again. NISA would end up with delays and would be deeper in the red before release. I don’t understand people like you that assume that NISA are trying to purposely fuck over their customers, they know people aren’t happy with the censorship. Whether they censored Criminal Girls a lot or a little it wouldn’t change the demographic that is interested in the game, a game like that can’t appeal to a larger audience regardless of cuts. NISA isn’t stupid, they obviously know this. You people are too fixated on thinking that NISA is lying about EVERYTHING.

  25. grgspunk
    grgspunk
    July 19, 2014 at 10:54 pm

    Cutting costs? More like half-assing it. Regardless, whatever costs they save from having a game rated only once is irrelevant, because in the end, fans like myself still got screwed over.

    So why should it matter to me if they incur extra costs? If it does get rated AO (which you can’t tell me for sure it was bound to happen), then at least they actually have credible evidence that they at least tried everything they can. Only then will we be able to definitively blame the ESRB and not NISA.

    The ESRB is not needed to censor content–It only takes one or two people in the localization team to be uncomfortable with said content in order for the decision to censor gets through. When this happens, the licenseholders in Japan will always work with them because they always go for the less risky route.

    Without tangible evidence from a trusted souce (IE: An official statement/rating from ESRB), there’s no way we can tell if NISA truly tried did everything they can to get it rated uncut or if they themselves were either scared of, or even disgusted with the content.

    Instead of doing what they’re supposed to do, they’ve been chipping away at the trust of fans due to cutting content and other questionable localization practices. It’s been happening for years, with the first major incidient being their butchering of Rhapsody DS in 2008. More recently, almost every game they announce nowadays is met with the question “Is anything going to be censored?” because of what’s been going on.

    We don’t even know who this “adviser” is–How can you possibly blame the ESRB if there’s nothing official to show for it?

    You say they have to pay extra if they have to re-rate it. So what? Wouldn’t paying extra be worth it to rebuild some of that trust towards fans?

    You sound like rednal and some of the other jackasses that try to defend their NISA’s actions on their forums. It’s NOT going to work here.

  26. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 19, 2014 at 11:11 pm

    Well I’m just going off what our NISA rep told me – he’s one of their main PR handlers.

    I trust what he says, but at the same time – I don’t agree with the AO thing.. I mean I’ll dig into it further with the ESRB, because it just doesn’t make sense how games with gratuitous violence get a pass, while games that sexualize things get lambasted.

  27. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 19, 2014 at 11:12 pm

    The thing is, the quote is literally from our NISA rep, so I’m not sure where the staff on their forums lie as far as their production goes.

    I think further clarification (from the ESRB) is needed, so I’m going to officially start talks with them on Monday and see what they say.

  28. grgspunk
    grgspunk
    July 19, 2014 at 11:31 pm

    “In situations like this I always place the blame on the ESRB not the
    publisher. No company that localizes niche games wants to censor the
    games they release. There is a world of difference between this and a
    company like Nintendo censoring Bravely Default.”

    MoeNovel would like to speak with you.

  29. bf313
    bf313
    July 19, 2014 at 11:34 pm

    Haha totally forgot about that controversy! Very good point there, that was some absolute bullshit from MoeNovel. That is a situation where I would keep my wallet closed and put the blame on the publisher.

  30. bf313
    bf313
    July 19, 2014 at 11:51 pm

    I don’t think you understand how business works. That wouldn’t be a case of cutting costs that would be a case of throwing money away and acting against advice. Based on what i’ve seen of this game I would not be at all surprised if it received an AO from the ESRB if it was uncut. And of course YOU don’t care about the extra costs but that isn’t how business works especially with niche game publishers who i’m sure deal with tight money margins. You can’t just throw thousands of dollars at something and “hope” in order to appease some people and say “see we told you it’d be AO”. Spending thousands of dollars to MAYBE appease angry people on the internet isn’t a wise choice. NISA has most likely already factored in the sales lost from the people who would “boycott” it and decided that they would still profit off of the game. I doubt they would have brought it over otherwise.

    Honestly I don’t give a shit about defending NISA because ultimately i’m going to speak with my wallet and buy the game, and i’m going to be getting what I want so it works just fine! Did the same thing with Mon Mon and did not regret it for a second! Seems to all work out fine in the end for me!

  31. grgspunk
    grgspunk
    July 20, 2014 at 12:00 am

    Please investigate the matter further in any way you can, particularly with regards to what ESRB has to say. Considering how easy it can be for localization companies to make these sorts of changes, I feel like we’re not applying enough scrutiny to NISA as we are with the ESRB.

    I mean, It definitely doesn’t make sense how violence gets a pass but sexuality gets lambasted, but this view can be shared just as much by the people involved development/localization as much as it could be shared by those involved in the ratings process.

  32. grgspunk
    grgspunk
    July 20, 2014 at 12:03 am

    Yeah, thanks a lot for contributing to the censorship problem, pal. You’re really helping us out there.

  33. bf313
    bf313
    July 20, 2014 at 12:51 am

    Thanks for being small minded and not looking at the big picture.

  34. Alistair
    Alistair
    July 20, 2014 at 5:31 am

    You could ask PEGI too I try to & got back they can’t comment of a game till it get rated. So I’m thinking if they can’t comment to me, they couldn’t commented to NISA.

    Did you see my pic is that what ESRB looking for does What ESRB think of boobs & buttocks do ESRB see boobs & buttocks as not visible sex organs.

    Like PEGI see them in that light.

  35. Darkling
    Darkling
    July 20, 2014 at 5:53 am

    Vote with your wallet people DON’T BUY GAMES THAT ARE CENSORED if NISA doesnt learn this they will either have to die or release uncensored games

  36. Alistair
    Alistair
    July 21, 2014 at 1:28 pm

    Yo I just got a latest email from PEGI it was about both the senran k & CG it not helpful but it tells me if PEGI had seen it it won’t censored it like they say just rate them.

    & what did ESRB said today any luck dude or the normal we don’t comment on stuff Shit lol

  37. Captmotorcycle
    Captmotorcycle
    July 21, 2014 at 2:51 pm

    My, bro.

  38. 32
    32
    July 21, 2014 at 9:07 pm

    If the AO Rating is for clothed girls who make erotic noises while getting touched I think that rating has suddenly changed meaning. The definition of the sexual aspect of the AO Rating is “graphic sexual content” and this is nowhere near that level.

    I guess I can’t think of any game that allows you to have a similar mini-game experience but plenty of M-Rated titles have had heavy sexual themes, people in less clothing (in an erotic way, instead of tasteful nudity) and touching mini-games. I don’t see how combining the lot would make it any worse.

    It might just be another “we didn’t feel it was suitable for Western audiences” instead of the ESRB. I’d rather have more detail on what is being changes – mostly on the conversational differences. The rating boards wouldn’t be at fault whatever the case: they have their rules and guidelines. I don’t believe they’re moral watchdogs trying to get things cut and such – most censorship is self-censorship. (The only crazy ratings board is the Australian one. ;))

    “Presumably this would lead to similar games possibly getting different ratings”
    Surely it’s more about rating things by themselves and not comparing the two. You go by the rules, not what other games did (if one game maybe got a higher rating than necessary than that is that particular game’s problem).

  39. 32
    32
    July 21, 2014 at 9:11 pm

    Not part of the discussion, but this is somewhat relevant.

    http://a.pomf.se/hbwwwo.jpg

    Especially since Houk has said that going to rating boards multiple times costs money, they probably just chopped bits out first just to cover themselves and make sure it didn’t get a high rating even if they were safe. They’re pretty happy to cut things up.

  40. Brandon Orselli
    Brandon Orselli
    July 21, 2014 at 9:24 pm

    I promise you guys that I will contact the ESRB tomorrow. They haven’t answered my email so I’m going to call them.

    Today was just a shitty day in my day-job so I didn’t have time to ring them. Hopefully they’ll give us something.

  41. Alistair
    Alistair
    July 21, 2014 at 9:26 pm

    That email look kinda fishy it’s my email response 1 of many I send off two more email, because like a idiot I forgot to enclose some pics. I’m now on xseed’s I just found my password.

    Tom is right PEGI doesn’t mind the racy images but I didn’t know that PEGI didn’t ask to see CP Fanservice stuff.

    So it’s like they more focus on its violence, so violence takes top stop for higher ratings while sexy imagines get the lower rating. Therefor CG can get a rating uncensored.

  42. Eldhin Hellknight
    Eldhin Hellknight
    July 25, 2014 at 12:15 pm

    this game? a guaranteed AO rating??? HAHAHAHAHAHAHA… that’s funny XD

  43. What’s the deal with censorship? | Button Smashers Blog
    October 7, 2014 at 7:21 am

    […] not always the ones to blame for these decisions. As is noted in Brandon Orselli’s article over on Nichegamer.net, the developer sometimes has to make these changes or risk an Ao (Adult only) rating. Ao is ok an […]

  44. BlackC#Bro
    BlackC#Bro
    November 11, 2014 at 12:29 pm

    “I don’t read articles at all so NISA is terrible!”

  45. 30SilverHorses&30GoldenKnights
    30SilverHorses&30GoldenKnights
    November 25, 2014 at 1:46 pm

    Well, shit, I’d buy it online if I could get it uncensored.

    Again, I think that anyone who’s even thinking about getting this game doesn’t give a single f*ck about whether it sells in their local store anyways.

    We want the game, and we’ll buy it online if we have to. I actually think that most people are going to end up buying it online anyways.

    I mean… Most people don’t want others to see them buying something where the cast looks to be majorly loli. I don’t care either way. My GameStop knows I’m a weird borderline weeb who is a huge lolicon. But, I’m not everyone.

    Also, I’m uncertain as to what exactly is getting censored. Or, arguably, more importantly, how much of it is getting censored.

    There is a fine line between “Okay whatever I still want it”, and “No, no. That’s too much. You removed the icing from the cake. I do not want.”

    I got a PSVita specifically for weird Japanese Imports, and any kind of censorship really feels like they’re giving me the shaft.

    I get these games so I can find people to bond over how much we like the weirdness, and censorship just ends up making harder to find the people who actually like the weirdness and not the censored version of the weirdness.

    But, you know what they could do? They could just release an uncensored and a censored version of the game. Sell the uncensored for a slightly higher price, and then just watch to see what the consumer does.

    I feel they their using the “either/or” fallacy. They could just throw both into the market, and then use the results to dictate how they handle this kind of thing in the future.

    In that situation everyone wins.

  46. Lord Browning
    Lord Browning
    November 25, 2014 at 2:03 pm

    So they just lie there silent as the grave and take it? Fuck that, i’m not buying. Screw you NIS

  47. Setsu Oh
    Setsu Oh
    February 4, 2015 at 2:33 pm

    I WOULD AVE ENJOYED ZE GAME MINIGAMES-LESS, ZAT IS WAT I WANTED ZE GAME TO BE TO BEGIN WIT. not a pervy ting zat isnt cute anymore because of ze minigame

  48. Alistair
    Alistair
    February 5, 2015 at 5:57 am

    Well it’s out tomorrow for EU & the 1st fall-out was shown on wednesday in this farce censorship scam.

    “We had to censored CG because some rating boards deem to BE so naughty & may get a AO from ERSB, & made some minor edits for wider appeal to get it release.”

    That makes total sense right butcher a game, give the SJWs what they want no need to banned said game. Because it been censored right.

    So please explain why 3 regions can’t get it from the PSN store aus, Ireland & New Zealand are the 3 region not getting censored CG.

    It was said if you don’t censored games said games won’t be allow. I found this quite comical hahaha lol.

    Maybe 3 regions was so angry about censorship they boycott themseves.

  49. Adam Cartrette
    Adam Cartrette
    March 10, 2015 at 8:52 am

    I don’t accept NISA’s claim about an AO rating. There are already games out that defines the standard of what ESRB has allowed to be in M vs AO.

    God of War games are rated Mature which has topless 3D model nudity and actual sex mini-game with audio that rewards the player with orbs.

    The main issue is that NISA only funds one version of the game for all of their markets. Other game companies get around censorship issues by either making alternate versions or passing the job on to another localization company.